News & Events

New Course! How to Operate More Effectively in the New Threat Environment: Educating the Next Generation of Intelligence Professionals

October 18-20, 2016 (Arlington, Virginia)

Both intelligence communities – government and private-sector – need to better understand the nature of their current and future competitive environments and learn how to operate more effectively in the emerging threat environment.

We offer this program jointly with the FGH Academy of Competitive Intelligence (ACI). ACI is the oldest educational institution dedicated to training managers and companies in better managing risks and anticipating new market opportunities through the use of competitive, market, and strategic intelligence.

This two and a half day educational program will be led by three of the most experienced and respected educators in the intelligence field, both government and private sector.

Over the last several years, Intelligence Professionals in government have been tasked by Policymakers to address an increasing number of issues that had previously been mainly of concern to the private-sector, e.g., the protection of corporate intellectual property (IP) and company’s global supply chains. These topics along with concern for cyber threats to basic infrastructure operations such as the electrical grid and water supplies have gradually increased the amount of new national security intelligence work – but without the additional resources or related analytical skills. At the same time, private-sector intelligence and security professionals are facing increased threats from international competitors, some of which are state-owned and do not operate by the same set of legal and ethical standards that most multinational corporations do. Few private-sector intelligence organizations are prepared to cope with such competitors.

Both intelligence communities – government and private-sector – need to better understand the nature of their current and future competitive environments, and to begin to develop both the intelligence sources and analytical skills that they will need to operate more effectively in the emerging threat environment. This educational program will provide attendees from both communities a forum to begin understanding the future intelligence environment that they will each face, and begin the process of developing ways that they might better work together to deal with similar issues and organizational challenges. This course is designed to help intelligence practitioners prepare for the new and emerging intelligence environment that both government and private-sector intelligence organizations will be facing in the years to come.

Mark_Lowenthal2016

Day 1: Mark Lowenthal “Issues for the Intelligence Professional”
8:30am-4:30pm
Dr. Lowenthal will address Open Source Intelligence Today; Training an Intelligence Work Force; and Warning Intelligence: What, How.

 

Herring2016Day 2: Jan P. Herring “The Future Competitive Environment Facing Both Public and Private-sector Intelligence Professionals”
8:30am-4:30pm
Mr. Herring will address 
the ‘Future Intelligence’ Environment for Private-sector Intelligence Professionals; New Types of Intelligence Professionals that will be needed in “That Future”; New Analytical Techniques and Tools for The Future Intelligence Environment

TipFinal2016Day 3: Tip Clifton “Innovating in Analytics”
8:30am-12:30pm
Successful organizations today increasingly leverage information to support decision-making across the enterprise. The shift from information and technology scarcity to over-abundance has radically tilted the playing field away from collection and towards analysis, opening up huge opportunities for business. Organizations can (and now must) innovate rapidly in analytics; to do so requires organizational commitment, understanding the organizational impediments to analytics innovation, and a decision-centric approach for achieving change. This half day session will use case studies to illustrate principles of effective innovation in analytics.

Course registration is handled directly through ACI.  More information can be found here.

ACI LOGO

 

The George Washington University – Cyberforce Superiority® Course

The George Washington University offers our Cyberforce Superiority® Executive/Managers introductory-level course through its College of Professional Studies and Cyber Academy. The next session will be held March 21-25, 2016 at GW’s Virginia Science & Technology Campus located in Ashburn,VA.

Course registration is handled directly through the university. 

More information can be found here.

 

Cyberforce Superiority®: Risk & Mitigation (University of Alabama)

Our Cyberforce Superiority®: Risk & Mitigation course will be hosted by The University of Alabama’s Cyber Institute on January 21, 2016 at the Bryant Conference Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

Course registration is handled directly through the University.  More information can be found here.

 

Cyberforce Superiority training at JHU

Johns Hopkins University offers our Cyberforce Superiority®: Cyber Operations Introduction to Foundational Elements introductory-level course as part of their Advanced Academics Programs’ curriculum for their Certificate in National Security Studies and Masters degrees in Government and Global Security Studies. The next session begins on January 25 at JHU’s Krieger School of Arts & Sciences in Washington, DC.

Course registration is handled directly through the university.  More information can be found here.

 

Intelligence Budget Process course – 20-21 January 2016

Secure your seat now for this two-day course where students will be given a detailed understanding of the intelligence budget process, examining both how the budget is created in the Executive branch, primarily in negotiations between Defense and Intelligence, and then how the budget moves through Congress, and the actual expenditure of funds. This course is extremely helpful to those who are new to the budget process and to those who have programmatic responsibilities that are influenced by federal budget decisions.   The course is made up of several modules including Intelligence Resources and Funding; Key Players in Defense and Intelligence Resource Management; Resource Data Structure; the Congressional Budget Process and Oversight of Intelligence; and Budget Execution.

This course enables students to comprehend how military and national-level intelligence resource requirements are met through the federal budget process and gain a good working knowledge of the associated processes and terminology. Students will learn the following about the National Intelligence Program (NIP) and Military Intelligence Program (MIP): what each program entails; the types of assets and activities funded under each of their component programs; the roles of various key Defense and Intelligence players in their management and oversight; the details of the budget process associated with each; how the Congress authorizes NIP and MIP activities and appropriates the funding needed to carry out these activities; and key aspects of the process through which NIP and MIP budgets are executed.

This course is typically only delivered to clients on-site in a 3-day version and is being offered through the OpenAcademy in a condensed version by popular demand.

Students will be provided with a copy of the textbook Managing Intelligence Resources, 4th edition, written by Dan Elkins. This publications serves as the most authoritative consolidated reference on intelligence and defense resource management for the intelligence and defense communities written by a nationally-recognized expert in defense and intelligence resource management.

 

Intelligence Budget Process – 20-21 January 2015

We have scheduled the next offering of this two-day course where students will be given a detailed understanding of the intelligence budget process, examining both how the budget is created in the Executive branch, primarily in negotiations between Defense and Intelligence, and then how the budget moves through Congress, and the actual expenditure of funds. This course is extremely helpful to those who are new to the budget process and to those who have programmatic responsibilities that are influenced by federal budget decisions.   The course is made up of several modules including Intelligence Resources and Funding; Key Players in Defense and Intelligence Resource Management; Resource Data Structure; the Congressional Budget Process and Oversight of Intelligence; and Budget Execution.

This course enables students to comprehend how military and national-level intelligence resource requirements are met through the federal budget process and gain a good working knowledge of the associated processes and terminology. Students will learn the following about the National Intelligence Program (NIP) and Military Intelligence Program (MIP): what each program entails; the types of assets and activities funded under each of their component programs; the roles of various key Defense and Intelligence players in their management and oversight; the details of the budget process associated with each; how the Congress authorizes NIP and MIP activities and appropriates the funding needed to carry out these activities; and key aspects of the process through which NIP and MIP budgets are executed.

This course is typically only delivered to clients on-site in a 3-day version and is being offered through the OpenAcademy in a condensed version by popular demand.

Students will be provided with a copy of the textbook Managing Intelligence Resources, 4th edition, written by Dan Elkins. This publications serves as the most authoritative consolidated reference on intelligence and defense resource management for the intelligence and defense communities written by a nationally-recognized expert in defense and intelligence resource management.

 

Last chance to secure your seat! Special Session: Monitoring the Iran Nuclear Deal – August 31 – Register Now!

Presented by: INSA logo Intelligence & Security Academy

 

Monitoring the Iran Nuclear Deal

The ability of the United States and other states to monitor the terms of the nuclear deal with Iran is obviously a key issue in the decision to accept this accord, or not. Monitoring and verifying arms control agreements is an area where the United States has over forty years of experience but the overall process if far from straightforward.

This briefing will review the following topics:

  • What do we mean by monitoring? Who does that?
  • What do we mean by verification? Who does that?
  • How do these differ from nuclear safeguard agreements?
  • What are the key monitoring and verification concerns in the Iran agreement?

Date: Monday, August 31, 2015

Time: 8:30 – 11:30 am

Location:
4121 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
CENTRA Technology Conference Center
Arlington, Virginia 22203

Registration fee: $300

Requirements: U.S. citizenship; private sector

Joseph DeTrani
President of INSA; former Senior Advisor to the Director of National Intelligence and the Director of the National Counterproliferation Center and the Intelligence Community Mission Manager for North Korea; Special Envoy for Six-Party Talks with North Korea, with the rank of Ambassador, and as the U.S. Representative to the Korea Energy Development Organization (KEDO).

Mark Lowenthal
President of the Intelligence & Security Academy; former Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Analysis & Production; participant in U.S. arms control deliberations, 1983-89.

Follow this link to register through INSA today!

 

Special Session: Monitoring the Iran Nuclear Deal – August 31 – Register Now!

Presented by: INSA logo Intelligence & Security Academy

Monitoring the Iran Nuclear Deal

The ability of the United States and other states to monitor the terms of the nuclear deal with Iran is obviously a key issue in the decision to accept this accord, or not. Monitoring and verifying arms control agreements is an area where the United States has over forty years of experience but the overall process if far from straightforward.

This briefing will review the following topics:

  • What do we mean by monitoring? Who does that?
  • What do we mean by verification? Who does that?
  • How do these differ from nuclear safeguard agreements?
  • What are the key monitoring and verification concerns in the Iran agreement?

Date: Monday, August 31, 2015

Time: 8:30 – 11:30 am

Location:
4121 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 200 (2nd Floor)
CENTRA Technology Conference Center
Arlington, Virginia 22203

Registration fee: $300

Requirements: U.S. citizenship; private sector

Joseph DeTrani
President of INSA; former Senior Advisor to the Director of National Intelligence and the Director of the National Counterproliferation Center and the Intelligence Community Mission Manager for North Korea; Special Envoy for Six-Party Talks with North Korea, with the rank of Ambassador, and as the U.S. Representative to the Korea Energy Development Organization (KEDO).

Mark Lowenthal
President of the Intelligence & Security Academy; former Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Analysis & Production; participant in U.S. arms control deliberations, 1983-89.

Follow this link to register through INSA today!

 

Cyberforce Superiority™: Executive/Managers Course – October 2015

Secure your seat now for
Cyberforce Superiority™

Cyberforce Superiority™, training cyber operators
to be more broadly based, integrating offense, defense and
forensics into a holistic program. 

Executive/Managers Course
October 26-30, 2015

Arlington, Virginia

The Executive/Managers Course gives students a technical sampling of the complete belt series in an immersive five-day offering.

Unlike most cyber training courses that emphasize either computer security or hacking skills, our course is designed to give students a preliminary integrated understanding of the methodologies and interrelated offensive and defensive factors that come into play when training a cyber warrior.  Students will learn a sample of the introductory, mid-level, and high-level tactics used for Computer Network Operations (CNO) including Computer Network Attack (CNA) & Computer Network Exploitation (CNE), Computer Network Defense (CND), as well as Computer forensics.  Topics of instruction include: ethical hacking, Boolean Logic, networking for both advanced Unix and Windows, vulnerability identification, computer exploit development, and reverse engineering.

This is a practical course with instruction that is focused on in-class computer exercises and lab work.   This course is ideal for executives, managers and supervisory personnel who play a role in planning, operations, risk assessment, policy, and ethics.  This course also allows the more technical student to benchmark his or her skills against the entirety of curriculum learning objectives.

These courses are offered in partnership with Raytheon Solipsys. 

 

CIA plans major reorganization and a focus on digital espionage

CIA plans major reorganization and a focus on digital espionage

The Washington Post
By Greg Miller
March 6, 2015

The CIA embarked on a sweeping restructuring Friday that will bring an end to divisions that have been in place for decades, create 10 new centers that team analysts with operators, and significantly expand the agency’s focus on digital espionage.

The plans were unveiled by CIA Director John Brennan to a workforce in which thousands of employees are likely to see changes in which departments they work for, the lines of authority they report to and even where they sit.

The overhaul is designed to foster deeper collaboration and an intensified focus on a range of security issues and threats, replacing long-standing divisions that cover the Middle East, Africa and other regions with hybrid “mission centers” modeled on the CIA’s Counterterrorism Center.

The CIA will also create a directorate focused exclusively on exploiting advances in computer technology and communications. The Directorate of Digital Innovation will rank alongside the agency’s operations and analysis branches, and it will be responsible for missions ranging from ­cyber-espionage to the security of the CIA’s internal e-mail.

In a briefing with reporters, Brennan described the far-reaching changes as “part of the natural evolution of an intelligence agency” that has not seen a significant reorganization in decades.

A central aim, he said, is to eliminate “seams” in coverage that lead to confusion over which part of the agency is responsible for tracking a specific issue or threat. After the reorganization, Brennan said, the CIA should be in position to “cover the entire universe, regionally and functionally, and so something that’s going on in the world falls into one of those buckets.”

The changes, however, are also likely to create turmoil at a time that Brennan and others frequently characterize as the most complicated and challenging period for intelligence agencies in a generation. Brennan said the plan has been received enthusiastically by most at the agency, but there have also been signs of friction and disagreement.

The head of the CIA’s clandestine service recently decided to retire abruptly in part because of opposition to a plan that would strip his position of much of its authority over the agency’s covert operations overseas and the teams of spies that it deploys.

CIA veterans and experts described the restructuring as among the most ambitious since the agency was founded in 1947.

“This is a major reorganization, one of the largest and most fundamental they’ve had,” said Mark M. Lowenthal, a former senior CIA officer and an expert on the history of the U.S. intelligence community. Lowenthal also expressed concern that replicating the Counterterrorism Center may also mean replicating an approach criticized at times for being too driven by short-term objectives such as finding the next target for a drone strike.

“Where in this does John have what I would think of as his intellectual strategic reserve, people not worried about day-to-day stuff but who think about what is going to happen two years out?” Lowenthal said. “The centers tend not to do that. They tend to answer today’s mail.”

But Brennan defended the reforms as critical to the agency’s viability in an era of technological and social upheaval. At one point he compared the initiatives to an effort to avoid the fate of Kodak, the company that failed to foresee the impact of digital technology on its film franchise. “Things just passed them by,” Brennan said.

Brennan’s plan was endorsed by others in the Obama administration who noted the advantages of allowing operators and analysts to collaborate.

“I strongly endorse Director Brennan’s vision,” Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. said in a statement. “I see many advantages to this, but the one I want to highlight specifically is the impact this change will have in promoting integration.”

As part of Brennan’s plan, long-standing divisions focused on Africa, the Middle East and other regions will give way to centers of corresponding geographic boundaries. The Directorates of Intelligence and Operations — as the analysis and spying branches are known — will continue to exist but will function mainly as talent pools, recruiting and training personnel who can be deployed to the new centers.

“Some who grew up in the old structure will have heartburn with this, but those costs will be short term,” said Michael Morell, former deputy director of the CIA. Morell said that existing centers have “proven to be a very powerful combination” and that the Counterterrorism Center is “the most successful agency component over the last decade.”

The Directorate of Digital Innovation will perform a similar role, and absorb existing entities including the Open Source Center, which monitors Twitter and other social media sites for intelligence on such adversaries as the Islamic State, as well as the Information Operations Center, a secret organization that handles missions including cyber-penetrations and sabotage and is now the second-largest center at the CIA.

But Brennan made clear that the digital directorate will have a much broader mandate, responsible not only for devising new ways to steal secrets from cellphones and other devices, but also for helping CIA officers evade detection overseas in an age when their phones, computers and ATM cards leave digital trails. The head of the new directorate will be responsible for “overseeing the career development of our digital experts as well as the standards of our digital tradecraft,” Brennan said.

Brennan did not present a timetable for the reorganization, or provide names of those who will be picked to lead the new centers. Other aspects of the plan are also unclear, including how much power the new assistant directors will exert over CIA stations overseas.

Brennan began exploring plans for the restructuring last year, when he established a panel to evaluate his proposed changes. The leader of that group, a veteran paramilitary officer whose first name is Greg, was recently put in charge of the Directorate of Operations, one of several departments that will revert to more traditional titles after being rebranded in recent years.

Greg Miller covers the intelligence beat for The Washington Post.