News & Events

Additional Cyberforce Superiority™ courses offered at Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University, the Intelligence & Security Academy and Raytheon Solipsys continue to team together to offer Cyberforce Superiority™ training as part of JHU’s Advanced Academics Programs’ curriculum for their Certificate in National Security Studies and Masters degrees in Government and Global Security Studies. Courses are held at JHU’s Krieger School of Arts & Sciences in Washington, DC and are currently scheduled for the Summer and Fall terms.  More information can be found here (see Summer & Fall schedules).

Cyberforce Superiority

Johns Hopkins University Krieger School

 

September 2014 – Intro to U.S. Intelligence & Analyst Training – Registration Open!

Dr. Mark M. Lowenthal, former Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Analysis and Production, author of Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy (now in its 6th edition), and internationally recognized intelligence authority, will teach two courses this Fall. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to learn from one of the leading experts in intelligence.

Courses will be held at the Academy’s new headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, just two blocks from the Ballston Metro Rail.

Enrollment is capped at 24 seats, register now!

 

International SPY Museum: Why Intelligence Fails

IntlSpyMuseum

A video of this session can be found here.

Who lives in caves, only holy men or primitive cavemen? Dr. Milo Jones, visiting professor at IE Business School in Madrid, Spain, thinks that the answer to that question helps explain the intelligence failure of 9/11. He comes to the International Spy Museum to argue that the CIA’s repeated intelligence failures are a result of the fact that the CIA thinks that intelligence analysis is science while it is really a social process in which identity and culture play a major role. Also joining us for the evening will be Dr. Mark Lowenthal, CEO of the Intelligence and Security Academy and former assistant director of Central Intelligence for Analysis and Production. He will engage with Dr. Jones on the provocative conclusions of the book Constructing Cassandra: Reframing Intelligence Failure at the CIA, 1947–2001, that Jones co-authored with Philippe Silberzahn of EMLYON Business School in France.   

This event took place May 13, 2014. Published on June 16, 2014.

 

CIA Holds First Public National Security Conference

Georgetown University

June 12, 2014 – CIA Director Speaks at Agency’s First Public National Security Conference

The 67-year-old Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is facing historic challenges that affect national security and the transparency of intelligence collection, the agency’s director said at Georgetown yesterday.

“Today – and certainly not for the first time in our history – America’s intelligence community is at a crossroads,” said CIA director John O. Brennan at the agency’s first public national security conference. “The transformational impact of technology and enhanced scrutiny and skepticism of the value, legality and appropriateness of our mission have prompted a reexamination of the work of intelligence agencies, understandably and rightly so.”

The all-day conference in Georgetown’s historic Gaston Hall, “Ethos and Profession of Intelligence,” was co-sponsored by the university’s Security Studies Program. 

Dr. Mark Lowenthal, the Academy’s President & CEO, participated in the Roles of Intelligence in the 21st Century panel with Arif Alikhan, John McLaughlin and Ambassador John Negroponte. A video of this panel and others can be found here.

 

Overseeing Intelligence: Historians Brief Congress on Its Past Relationship with the Intelligence Community

June 11, 2014, American Historical Association, by Dane Kennedy
 
With Washington currently abuzz about the revelations regarding electronic surveillance by the NSA, the conflict between the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and the CIA over a forthcoming report on ”enhanced interrogation,” and various other controversies, what better time to consider how Congress has sought to oversee the intelligence community in the past? This was the subject of the Congressional Briefing that the National History Center held on Monday, June 9, in the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill.

The briefing was conducted by Laura Donohue, director of Georgetown University’s Center on National Security and the Law and author of The Cost of Counterterrorism: Power, Politics, and Liberty, and Mark Lowenthal, former assistant director of Central Intelligence for analysis and production, current adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University, and author of the textbook Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy, now in its fifth edition. Both speakers hold history degrees. James Grossman, executive director of the American Historical Association and chairman of the board of the National History Center, chaired the session. It attracted a full house and was filmed by C-SPAN.

Laura Donohue provided a richly detailed account of the rapid growth of the intelligence community following the passage of the National Security Act in 1947, the subsequent absence of congressional oversight of its activities, and the revelations in the early 1970s of domestic surveillance and other abuses by the CIA, the FBI, and other intelligence-gathering agencies. These abuses spurred investigations by Senate and House committees and the passage of laws that sought to rein in these agencies and keep Congress apprised of their activities.

http://blog.historians.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NHC-3.jpg

Mark Lowenthal provided a personal perspective on the subject, derived from years spent in the intelligence arena as a senior staff member of a congressional committee, a senior official in the CIA, a private consultant, and an academic. In 1974, he was completing his PhD in history under Ernest May at Harvard when the New York Times first exposed the domestic spying scandal, leading him on an unexpected career trajectory. He highlighted how the institutional structures put in place in response to the scandal actually operate.

Lowenthal argued that, although “it’s not pretty,” the system of congressional oversight works fairly well. The key to its success, he suggested, is control of the budget. Donohue was less sanguine. She felt that rapid advances in computer technology in recent decades have created a very different intelligence-gathering environment, one that outstrips the controls created in the reforms of the 1970s and 80s.

This stimulating session accomplished exactly what the Congressional Briefings are intended to achieve—showing how the past informs the present by examining the historical contexts of contemporary controversies.

- See more at: http://blog.historians.org/2014/06/overseeing-intelligence-historians-brief-congress-past-relationship-intelligence-community/

 

Cyberforce Superiority™ March 2014 courses – Register Now!

Secure your seat now for
Cyberforce Superiority™
May 2014 courses!

New location: Arlington, Virginia

Executive/Managers Course
May 5-9, 2014 (Arlington, Virginia)

White Belt Course
May 12-16, 2014 (Arlington, Virginia)

Cyberforce Superiority™, training cyber operators to be more broadly based, integrating offense, defense and forensics into a holistic program.  Select courses above for link to detailed course learning objectives and content.

These courses are offered in partnership with Raytheon Solipsys. 

 

Piedmont Virginia Community College offering Cyberforce Superiority™

Piedmont Virginia Community College is offering the Academy’s 5-day introductory Cyberforce Superiority™ course as part of its Spring 2014 Workforce Services course schedule.

This course will be held April 28-May 2, 2014 in Charlottesville. More information can be found here.

Cyberforce Superiority

 

Johns Hopkins University offering Cyberforce Superiority™: Foundational Elements

Johns Hopkins University now offers our Cyberforce Superiority™: Foundational Elements introductory-level course as part of their Advanced Academics Programs’ curriculum. 

The first session begins February 19, 2014 and runs for 2 1/2 weeks at JHU’s Krieger School of Arts & Sciences in Washington, DC.  

More information can be found here.

Cyberforce Superiority

Johns Hopkins University Krieger School

 

Cyberforce Superiority™ January & February 2014 courses – Register Now!

Secure your seat now for
Cyberforce Superiority™
January & February 2014 courses!

Executive/Managers Course
January 27-31, 2014 (Reston, Virginia)

White Belt Course
February 3-7, 2014 (Reston, Virginia)

Executive/Managers Course
February 10-14, 2014 (Reston, Virginia)

Cyberforce Superiority™, training cyber operators to be more broadly based, integrating offense, defense and forensics into a holistic program.  Select courses above for link to detailed course learning objectives and content.

These courses are offered in partnership with Raytheon Solipsys. 

 

Cyberforce Superiority™ training – additional courses scheduled in 2013!

Cyberforce SuperiorityResponding to client interest, we’ve scheduled additional Cyberforce Superiority™ Introduction courses in 2013 – secure your seat now!

  • August 5-9, 2013 (Reston, Virginia)
  • December 2-6, 2013 (Reston, Virginia)

Cyberforce Superiority™, training cyber operators to be more broadly based, integrating offense, defense and forensics into a holistic program.

Many experts agree that cyber is a new warfighting domain, requiring new approaches and new skills.  Unlike most cyber training courses that emphasize either computer security or hacking skills, the 5-day Cyberforce Superiority™ Introduction course is designed to give students a preliminary integrated understanding of the methodologies and interrelated offensive and defensive factors that come into play when training a cyber warrior. 

Are you interested in cyber and want to learn about all aspects surrounding the topic?  Are you a manager who needs to understand the basics of cyber operations in order to be able to communicate in a more effective manner with your employees? Are you interested in a comprehensive entrée into Computer Network Operations?  If so, this course is for you!

Students will learn the lexicon surrounding the cyber realm; will become familiar with the different facets of cyber operations to include attack, defense, forensics and exploit development; will understand the methodology and processes behind expoiting a system; and will comprehend and understand the difference between the introductory, mid-level, and high-level tactics used for Computer Network Operations (CNO) including Computer Network Attack (CNA) & Computer Network Exploitation (CNE), Computer Network Defense (CND), as well as Computer forensics.  Topics of instruction include: ethical hacking, Boolean Logic, networking for both advanced Unix and Windows, vulnerability identification, computer exploit development, and reverse engineering.  This will be a practical course with instruction that is focused on in-class computer exercises and lab work. 

Please note that this course has been approved for 4.1 CEUs by George Mason University.

This course is offered in partnership with Raytheon Solipsys.

REGISTER NOW – SEATS ARE LIMITED!